Tag Archives: subspace

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The Subzone (Role of the Viewer)

 

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Screenshot from Gmod (sandbox game) where a gamemap is glitched due to missing files on the player’s computer.

The viewer is expected to be an active agent, to interact with and to navigate around the virtual subspace. Instead of being led on to do something, the viewer would have full freedom to explore the area of the subspace. The viewer will not be held back from leaving the “gamearea” so to speak, and he or she will be allowed to freeroam to any part of the world map within the virtual environment.

The viewer would be able to intereact with objects and artifacts in this subspace, which may trigger reactions to occur in other parts of the space. The viewer would then become a catalyst for visual changes to occur within the subspace.

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The Subzone (Influences)

“Hole in Space”

Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz created a “portal” in the real world through which people could see and interact with one another even if they were miles apart. It was a 3 day event which attracted many active participants and provided for an entertaining archive footage of the whole affair. For my work, I wish to consider if it is possible to tear open a portal or hole in the third space, to reveal the underbelly of the hidden structures in the virtual game world. If this first stage is possible, I would consider about the possibility of inhabiting this said space.

Jon Cates

Jon Cates creates and also archives his various experiments with glitches. It is interesting to note how he views gifs as “cultural artifacts” and that they are a form of cultural cinema for the next generation. Taking a leaf from his practice, I intend to capture my experiences traversing and discovering hidden subspaces within the third space via gifs. Screenshots would also be a backup.

Robert Overweg

This Dutch photographer archives his explorations in the virtual realm, and I found his particular series of what looks to be building parts floating in space pretty interesting. The series, entitled “Flying and Floating”, consists of screenshots of buildings and architecture within a virtual environment which are cut off in various parts. To get such an effect, the photographer (i.e. Robert) would have to move himself into a position within the virtual landscape where he straddles between the subspace (i.e. between the normal virtual world and the unknown worldspace hidden beyond). By putting himself into such a position, the game becomes “corrupt”, where renderings of the virtual surroundings start cutting off at unpredictable angles and planes start disappearing. Just a simple shift in a physical location is enough to dynamically alter the actual perception of the virtual environment. The fact that this altered perception would be unique only to the photographer (Robert in this case) and that ¬†this perception would be dynamically different for other users, is something I wish to explore in my work.

Some examples from his “Flying and Floating” series:

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Hotel 2011, Robert Overweg, Mafia 2
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The Garage 2011, Robert Overweg, Mafia 2
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The Subzone (Introduction)

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Exploring the idea of the subspace within the third space.

An example would be in games where areas are closed off and characters are supposed to only roam within a restricted space. In some instances, venturing off from the restricted space creates penalties for the playaer (e.g. timelimit warning to return back to the “safe zone”, death). ¬†Other times, constant attempts to access the subspace within the third space in the games may cause corruption of data, unintended glitching and sometimes even crashing the game client. Can a player in the third space truly inhabit this space which is hidden from the naked eye? If so, at what cost to the other players or the game? How would this conflict with the intentions of the game itself?